Webinars

  • The Road to a High-Resolution 40-Color Flow Cytometry Immunophenotyping Panel

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 05/14/2021 at 12:00 PM (EDT)

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Maria C. Jaimes Keywords: High-dimensional flow cytometry, spectral flow cytometry, OMIP, Panel development

    About the Presenter

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    Maria C. Jaimes, PhD
    VP Technical Application Support
    Cytek Biosciences, Inc.

    Dr. Maria Jaimes earned her MD degree at the Universidad Javeriana in Colombia. Dr. Jaimes completed her postdoctoral training at Stanford University in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology. During her postdoc, she focused on characterizing the immune responses to both rotavirus and influenza viruses after natural infection and immunization. In 2005, Dr. Jaimes joined BD Biosciences, where she worked on different aspects of quality assurance and standardization of flow cytometry assays. In 2015, Dr. Jaimes joined Cytek Biosciences. She is part of the R&D team credited for developing the Aurora Full Spectrum Cytometer and has overseen the instrument characterization, verification, and development of multicolor applications. Besides her responsibilities within the R&D team, Dr. Jaimes leads the Technical Applications Support team worldwide.

    Webinar Summary

    This webinar will cover OMIP-069 (published in Cytometry Part A in August 2020), the first 40-color fluorescent panel using full spectrum flow cytometry to broadly phenotype much of the cellular composition of the human peripheral immune system. The panel in this OMIP has been thoroughly optimized to ensure high-quality data and well-resolved populations, enabling the description of most canonical subsets of T cells, B cells, NK cells, monocytes, and dendritic cells. Dr. Jaimes will present the journey of the technology, panel design, protocol development, data QC/QA, and data analysis which led to the successful achievement of this 40-color immune profiling panel. 

    Learning Objectives

    • Understand the concepts behind full spectrum profiling.
    • Learn the necessary steps and tools for good panel design.
    • Develop expertise on how to troubleshoot and optimize a multicolor panel.
    • Learn to recognize high quality vs. compromised data and the potential sources and mitigation of errors. 

    Who Should Attend

    SRL staff/directors, immunologists, CRO staff, and full spectrum flow cytometer users.

    CMLE Credit: 1.0

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  • Evaluating Spectral Cytometry for Immune Profiling in Viral Disease

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 04/21/2021 at 4:00 PM (EDT)

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Paula Niewold, PhD and Thomas Ashhurst, PhD

    About the Presenters

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    Paula Niewold, PhD
    Postdoctoral Researcher
    Department of Infectious Diseases
    Leiden University Medical Centre

    Dr. Paula Niewold is an immunologist currently working as a postdoctoral researcher at the Department of Infectious Diseases at the Leiden University Medical Centre. She is interested in host-pathogen interactions and how they impact the outcome of disease. She has studied these interactions in models of cerebral malaria, West Nile virus encephalitis, psoriasis, and tuberculosis using high-dimensional flow, mass, and imaging mass cytometry. She is an ISAC Marylou Ingram Scholar.

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    Thomas Ashhurst, PhD
    Immunologist and High-Dimensional Cytometry Specialist
    Sydney Cytometry Facility
    University of Sydney

    Dr. Thomas Ashhurst is an immunologist and high-dimensional cytometry specialist with the Sydney Cytometry Facility at the University of Sydney. He develops and applies a range of single-cell cytometry technologies and computational analysis tools to map dynamic immune responses over time, space, and disease. In particular, he applies these approaches to the study of immunology and infectious disease, including emerging pathogens such as COVID-19, Zika virus encephalitis, and West Nile virus encephalitis. He is an ISAC Marylou Ingram Scholar.

    Webinar Summary

    In conventional fluorescence cytometry, each fluorophore in a panel is measured in a target detector, through the use of wide band-pass optical filters. In contrast, spectral cytometry uses a large number of detectors with narrow band-pass filters to measure a fluorophore's signal across the spectrum, creating a more detailed fluorescent signature for each fluorophore. The spectral approach shows promise in adding flexibility to panel design and improving the measurement of fluorescent signal. However, few comparisons between conventional and spectral systems have been reported to date. Here we present our findings comparing conventional and spectral approaches to cytometry—including comparisons of compensation and unmixing—and evaluate the use of spectral cytometry for immune profiling in viral diseases.

    Learning Objectives

    • Gain an understanding of the essential differences between conventional and spectral approaches to cytometry.
    • Appreciate the differences between compensation and spectral unmixing.
    • Consider applications for spectral cytometry in the context of immunological studies.

    Who Should Attend

    Researchers and technical staff who utilize flow, spectral, or mass cytometry in their work.

    CMLE Credit: 1.0

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  • Reproducibility Crisis and Antibody Validation of Flow Cytometry

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 03/04/2021

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Pablo Engel, PhD

    About the Presenter

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    Pablo Engel, PhD
    Professor of Immunology
    University of Barcelona

    Pablo Engel obtained his MD and PhD from the University of Barcelona. After training as a postdoctoral fellow at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute of Harvard Medical School, Pablo became an assistant professor in the Department of Immunology at Duke University School of Medicine. He is currently a professor of immunology and head of the Immunology Unit in the Department of Biomedical Sciences at the University of Barcelona. His research is focused on lymphocyte cell-surface molecules and their role in the regulation of immune responses. He is also an expert in the production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies. In addition to his research, Pablo is Secretary General of the European Federation of Immunological Societies (EFIS).

    Webinar Summary

    The presentation will highlight the current reproducibility crisis, specifically reflecting on the effect of poorly validated antibodies on the research. The main causes of antibody failure will also be reviewed, as well as a basic antibody validation protocol for flow cytometry. Several solutions will be discussed to solve the problem of reproducibility. 

    Learning Objectives

    • To understand the urgent need of antibody validation.
    • To gain knowledge about basic antibody validation protocols.

    Who Should Attend

    Scientists and technologist that use monoclonal antibodies of flow cytometry.

    CMLE Credit: 1.0

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  • Collaborative Image Analysis in the Cloud for Improved Reproducibility and High Scalability

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 12/10/2020

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Dr. Peter Bajcsy, Dr. Nathan Hotaling, and Dr. Sreenivas Bhattiprolu

    About the Presenters

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    Dr. Peter Bajcsy
    Project Lead
    National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)
    Information Technology Laboratory (ITL)   

    Peter Bajcsy received his PhD in electrical and computer engineering in 1997 from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and an MS in electrical and computer engineering in 1994 from the University of Pennsylvania. He worked for machine vision, government contracting, and research and educational institutions before joining National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in June 2011. At NIST, he is leading a project focusing on the application of computational science in metrology, specifically live cell and material characterization at very large scales.

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    Dr. Nathan Hotaling
    Vice President
    Data Science Solutions
    Information Technology Research Branch
    National Center for Advancing Translational Science-NIH

    Dr. Nathan Hotaling is a senior data scientist within the Information Resources Technology Branch at National Center for Advancing Translational Science-NIH (NCATS). He received his PhD in biomedical engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology and an MS in clinical research from Emory University. After his PhD, Nathan conducted postdoctoral research in a joint project between the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the National Eye Institute (NEI), where he began to develop a platform to analyze high-content image datasets collected for cell bio-manufacturing. This work led to his transition to his current position where he oversees the development of a scalable image analysis platform to non-invasively assess cell and tissue architecture, functionality, phenotype, consistency, and viability. Using this platform with novel machine learning and deep learning techniques, he intends to unlock the next “-omics” of cell analysis, "Vis-omics," for both research and clinical projects. He has co-authored 22 journal papers, two book chapters, and three patents.

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    Dr. Sreenivas Bhattiprolu
    Head of Digital Solutions
    Research Microscopy Solutions
    ZEISS

    Dr. Sreenivas Bhattiprolu (Sreeni) is the head of digital solutions at Carl Zeiss Microscopy. His team focuses on solving tough microscopy challenges by leveraging the latest advancements in digital technology and artificial intelligence. Sreeni has over 25 years of experience in microscopy in a variety of fields including life sciences, materials sciences, geosciences, electronics, and semiconductor technologies. Sreeni received his PhD in materials sciences and engineering from Michigan Technological University and earned his master’s degree in physics from the University of Hyderabad.

    Webinar Summary

    According to a recent survey by Nature, more than 70 percent of researchers have tried and failed to reproduce another scientist's experiments. Many factors contributing toward irreproducibility can be addressed via automation and collaborative work. Computer cloud provides the right infrastructure to automate image analysis tasks, especially for resource-intensive applications. Cloud's importance in regards to collaborative work has also been heightened in light of the COVID-19 pandemic due to its accessibility from any location and any networked device. This webinar further explains the benefits of cloud-based image analysis and introduces the audience to two platforms that facilitate automation and collaborative work with microscopy images. These two platforms have been independently developed by ZEISS and NIST/NIH, respectively. The presentation will go over the main features of the two platforms that run computational workflows formed by software containers that are interoperable. The discussion will include a variety of commercial and open source aspects in developing and using such platforms by the ISAC community.   

    Learning Objectives

    1. Why web/cloud-based image software solutions? How does your software work? 
    2. What are the advantages/disadvantages of your platform compared to traditional/existing approaches? When is best to think about using WIPP or APEER to solve quantitative imaging problems? 
    3. What does your software do? What functionality does it have? What is the best way for a potential user or group to get started using your platform (i.e., downloading, required hardware, necessary expertise, etc.)? 
    4. Considering that web/cloud-based platforms are a newer tool with a much smaller user population compared to packages such as ImageJ, Matlab, and Cell Profiler, what do you see as the future for these platforms? How will they grow? What are your plans for rolling out your platform and increasing adoption rates?


    CMLE Credit: 1.0

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  • Designing Panels for the Study of Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 10/29/2020

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Dr. Steffen Schmitt and Dr. Marcus Eich

    About the Presenters

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    Dr. Steffen Schmitt
    German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ)  

    Steffen Schmitt studied biology at the Ruprecht-Karls-University Heidelberg and finished his PhD with a concentration in immunology. Subsequent to his postdoc, he developed the flow cytometric service at the Center for Natural and Medical Sciences (NMFZ) at Johannes-Gutenberg-University in Mainz. Since 2007 Steffen has headed the Flow Cytometry Core Facility of the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) in Heidelberg.

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     Dr. Marcus Eich
     Hi-Stem gGmbH

    Marcus Eich studied biology at the Technical University Darmstadt and earned his PhD in 2011 in toxicology at the University Medical Center Mainz. After an additional postdoc in Mainz in 2015, he joined the HI-STEM team and the Flow Cytometry Core Facility of the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) in Heidelberg.

    Webinar Summary

    The hematopoietic system is a very fascinating system to study as it can re-populate an entire system starting from just one cell. This webinar gives an overview of the targeted subpopulations of the hematopoietic system and how different experimental tasks and setups in one panel were combined. At the end, issues that occurred during the panel design are discussed and a short outlook is presented about how to further improve the panel.

    Learning Objectives

    • Understand the hematopoietic system from a backbone panel to specialized subpopulations, combining different experimental setups in panel design.
    • Apply tips and tricks for this panel.

    Who Should Attend

    PhD students, postdocs, and technicians involved in hematopoietic stem cell research.

    CMLE Credit: 1.0

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  • Experimental Design and Quality Control for High-Dimensional Human Immunophenotyping Studies in Large Cohorts

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 10/22/2020

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Thomas Liechti, PhD

    About the Presenter

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    Thomas Liechti
    Postdoctoral Researcher
    National Institutes of Health (NIH)

    Thomas Liechti obtained his PhD in immunology and microbiology at the University of Zurich in 2017 and is currently a postdoctoral researcher in Mario Roederer’s group at the Vaccine Research Center of the National Institutes of Health. His main interest is high-dimensional flow cytometry and human immunology. During his postdoctoral training, he established a 28-color flow cytometry sample processing and analysis pipeline to assess the contribution of genetic and environmental factors to human immune homeostasis. 

    Webinar Summary

    High-dimensional flow cytometry enables the characterization of the human immune system at unprecedent depth and at a population-wide scale. However, flow cytometry panel design poses many caveats and requires careful testing of several reagents and panel iterations to find optimal combinations of reagents with the best possible performance (i.e., low spill-over spreading and high resolution). 

    This webinar is the second part of a back-to-back webinar with Florian Mair. In the first part, Florian will cover the development and common caveats of high-parameter flow cytometry panels. In the second part of this webinar series, Thomas will be talking about more specific caveats he encountered during the development of panels described in OMIP-051, -058 and -060.

    Large immunophenotyping studies including thousands of samples and require several experiments over an extended period of time, which can be prone to inter-assay variation. Thomas will discuss strategies for building an optimal staining and sample processing pipeline for an immunophenotyping study. This process includes over 3,000 samples as well as tracking and reducing technical (instrument performance) and experimental variation. In addition, Thomas will give some outlook into data pre-processing including automated exclusion of data variation and compensation.

    Learning Objectives

    • An understanding for tackling high-dimensional immunophenotyping assays on a variety of platforms, thus minimizing trial-and-error experiences and wasted experiments
    • Review specific strategies for generating reproducible and high-quality data in large patient cohorts.

    Who Should Attend

    Anyone with an interest in efficient panel design: immunologists, scientists of any field doing polychromatic flow cytometry, SRL users, and SRL leaders.


    CMLE Credit: 1.0

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  • Panel Design - A Practical Guide for Successful Fluorescent Cytometry Panels from 10-40 Parameters

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 10/21/2020

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Florian Mair, PhD

    About the Presenter

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    Florian Mair
    Cytometry Specialist
    Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

    Florian graduated with a PhD from the University of Zurich, Switzerland in 2014 and is currently working at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center as an immunologist. During the past decade, he has been involved extensively with different cytometry platforms (conventional, spectral, and mass cytometry) as well as scRNA-seq technique. Florian is interested in applying novel analysis approaches for single cell data. He has been actively engaged in teaching flow cytometry courses including systematic panel design and analysis of high-dimensional cytometry experiments. Florian is currently an ISAC Marylou Scholar.

    Webinar Summary

    Over the past decade, technical improvements and new reagents have permitted fluorescent-based flow cytometry assays to measure up to 40 parameters. These complex assays require robust controls and thorough experimental planning, but there are currently few resources that provide a systematic approach for reliable panel design. Also, historical notions as to how fluorophores and controls should be chosen are sometimes at odds with the reality of modern panel design.

    In this webinar, we will provide a practical guide for successful fluorescent panel design for any complex panel from 10–⁠40 (or more) parameters, both for conventional compensation-based as well as spectral cytometry.

    Specifically, we will cover the following topics:

    • Brief overview of signal detection in conventional and spectral flow cytometers.
    • The concept and underlying cause of spreading error (SE).
    • How the spillover spreading matrix (SSM) can be efficiently used to guide panel design.
    • Relevant relationships between SE, fluorophore brightness, and antigen expression level.
    • Step-by-step approaches toward building a new panel.
    • An overview of essential controls and typical caveats.

    This webinar is back-to-back with a webinar by Thomas Liechti, who will be talking about how to best design and use complex panels for large study cohorts (100s-1000s of samples) including the use of appropriate controls and analysis approaches.

    Learning Objectives

    • An understanding for tackling high-dimensional immunophenotyping assays on a variety of platforms, thus minimizing trial-and-error experiences and wasted experiments
    • Review specific strategies for generating reproducible and high-quality data in large patient cohorts.

    Who Should Attend

    Anyone with an interest in efficient panel design: immunologists, scientists of any field doing polychromatic flow cytometry, SRL users, and SRL leaders.


    CMLE Credit: 1.0

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  • Mitochondrial Functionality and Metabolism in Human T Cells

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 10/13/2020

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Sara De Biasi, PhD

    About the Presenter

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    Sara De Biasi
    Postdoctoral Research
    University of Modena and Reggio Emilia

    Sara De Biasi obtained her PhD in clinical and experimental medicine (immunology) from the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia in 2013. Most of her work focuses on the variability of adaptive immune response in HIV, autoimmune disease, and cancer. For the last two years, she has studied T cell metabolism with particular interest in mitochondria. Dr. De Biasi is an ISAC Marylou Ingram Scholar and a member of the CYTO U Task Force. 

    Webinar Summary

    This webinar will focus on methods to investigate metabolic changes and mithochondria functionality of T cell subpopulations. Data obtained studying T cells in a group of progressive multiple sclerosis patients will be discussed.

    Learning Objectives

    Upon completion of this webinar, you will be able to:

    • Evaluate mitochondria phenotype and functionality.
    • Evaluate T cell metabolism. 
    • Evaluate differences among functionally for different T cells.

    Who Should Attend

    Researchers who want to learn how to dissect metabolic changes, mitochondrial phenotype, and functionality in human T cells in different pathophysiological conditions.

    CMLE Credit: 1.0

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  • ISAC General Business Meeting

    Contains 3 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/23/2020

    ISAC General Business Meeting 2020

    Introduction

    Hear from ISAC's President Andrea Cossarizza, President-Elect Jonni Moore, Treasurer Jessica Houston, and Executive Director Michelle Butler on the state of the society, its finances, and future during ISAC's annual business meeting on June 23.

    Agenda

    1. Call to Order - Andrea Cossarizza
    2. Approval of June 26, 2019 - Andrea Cossarizza CYTO 2019 General Business Meeting Minutes
    3. Treasurer's Report - Jessica Houston
    4. ISAC's Leadership Development Program - Andrea Cossarizza
    5. ISAC's State of the Society - Andrea Cossarizza
    6. Introduction of New ISAC Officers and Councilors - Andrea Cossarizza
    7. ISAC – Moving to the Future - Jonni Moore
    8. Old Business - Jonni Moore
    9. New Business - Jonni Moore
    10. Moderated Questions & Answers from Audience - Michelle Butler
    11. Adjournment - Jonni Moore

    Click here to view the minutes of the 2019 ISAC General Business Meeting.

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  • Discovering Immune Features During COVID-19 By Advanced Cytometry

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 05/28/2020

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Andrea Cossarizza, PhD

    About the Presenter

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    Andrea Cossarizza
    Full Professor of Pathology and Immunology
    University of Modena and Reggio Emilia

    Andrea Cossarizza is a full professor of pathology and immunology, vice president of the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, and former president of the International Society for Advancement of Cytometry (ISAC). He has been studying the molecular and cellular basis of immune system-based diseases for 35 years. He is currently at the forefront of the fight against COVID-19 and has provided the first contributions regarding the importance of cytometry in understanding the immune response to SARS-CoV-2. As of May 2020, he has published 332 papers in peer-reviewed journals, has an H index of 79, and received over 33,000 citations.

    Webinar Summary

    The immune system is heavily involved in the pathogenesis of COVID-19 and its activation (which includes the so-called cytokine storm) and is the main force that drives the course of the infection. This webinar will present the most recent data on main changes that occur among different lymphocyte populations, along with functional analysis of T cells, and discuss current and possible therapeutic approaches.

    Learning Objectives

    • Describe the main changes that occur in the immune system during different phases of the infection with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.
    • Identify cytometric techniques that have been used to better understand changes that occur in the immune system during the infection and its recovery.

    Who Should Attend

    Researchers, clinicians, laboratory managers, and personnel involved in the fight against SARS-CoV-2 who want to know the latest discoveries on the role of the immune system during COVID-19.

    CMLE Credit: 1.0

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  • Intelligent Image-Activated Cell Sorting: A Tutorial

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 01/08/2020

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Keisuke Goda, PhD

    About the Presenter

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    Keisuke Goda, PhD
    Professor
    Department of Chemistry at the University of Tokyo

    Dr. Keisuke Goda is a professor in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Tokyo, an adjunct professor in the Institute of Technological Sciences at Wuhan University, and an adjunct professor in the Department of Bioengineering at UCLA. He obtained a BA degree from UC Berkeley summa cum laude in 2001 and a PhD from MIT in 2007, both in physics. At MIT, he worked on the development of gravitational-wave detectors in the LIGO group which led to the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics. After several years of work on high-speed imaging and microfluidics at UCLA, he joined the University of Tokyo as a professor. His research group focuses on the development of serendipity-enabling technologies based on molecular imaging and spectroscopy together with microfluidics and computational analytics to push the frontier of science. He is an associate editor of Cytometry Part A and APL Photonics. He has published over 350 journal and conference papers, filed over 30 patents, and received numerous awards such as Japan Academy Medal, JSPS Prize, and Analytical Chemistry Young Innovator Award.

    Webinar Summary

    The advent of intelligent Image-Activated Cell Sorting (iIACS) has enabled high-throughput intelligent image-based sorting of single live cells or cell clusters with unique morphochemical features that are difficult to discern when compressing these spatial data into intensity signals in fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) [Nitta et al., Cell 175, 266-276 (2018)]. iIACS is an on-chip microfluidic technology that builds on a seamless integration of a high-throughput fluorescence microscope, cell focuser, cell sorter, and deep neural network on a hybrid software-hardware data management architecture, thereby providing the combined merits of optical microscopy, FACS, and deep learning [Isozaki et al., Nature Protocols 14, 2370-2425 (2019)]. Therefore, iIACS serves as an essential part of holistic single-cell analysis by providing direct connections between population-level analysis (flow cytometry), cell-level analysis (microscopy), and gene-level analysis (sequencing) of sorted cells. In this webinar, Keisuke will give a tutorial about the principles and applications of iIACS and compare the usability of iIACS with other technologies such as fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), imaging flow cytometry (without sorting), and image-based cell pickers.

    Learning Objectives

    • Explore the principles and applications of the iIACS technology.

    Who Should Attend

    FACS developers/users, imaging flow cytometry developers/users, single-cell analysis researchers, etc.

    CMLE Credit: 1.0

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  • High-Speed Cell Sorter Biosafety and Containment Testing

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 12/17/2019

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Geoffrey Lyon, MPH

    About the Presenter

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    Geoffrey Lyon, MPH
    Yale Flow Cytometry Facility Manager/BSL-3 Sort Operator
    Yale University

    Geoffrey Lyon is a Flow Cytometry Facility manager/BSL-3 Sort operator at Yale University. One of his most prominent career achievements is discovering cell sorter AMS filter failures. He is a member of the ISAC Biosafety Committee, a former ABSA International Course presenter, a Yale BSL-3 Subcommittee member, and a BSL-3 Certified Researcher and Trainer.

    Webinar Summary

    This webinar explores the various biosafety aspects of high-speed cell sorting. The emphasis of this presentation is the evolution and development of aerosol containment testing including the new ISAC standard that uses a novel impactor and microspheres to test containment. This new assay can be utilized to test sorters housed inside or outside of a biosafety cabinet.

    Learning Objectives

    • Examine the hazards and risks associated with cell sorting along with a detailed explanation of the latest containment testing method.
    • Describe how to implement the new testing method into existing safety protocols to ensure cells sorters have adequate aerosol containment.    

    Who Should Attend

    Anyone who uses high-speed cell sorters, sort operators, health and safety professionals, or anyone interested in biosafety.

    CMLE Credit: 1.0

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  • Single Cell Analysis of Autofluorescence Lifetime Images

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 11/19/2019

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Alex Walsh, PhD

    About the Presenter

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    Alex Walsh, PhD
    Assistant Professor in Biomedical Engineering
    Texas A&M University

    Dr. Walsh completed her Ph.D. at Vanderbilt University, where she developed an autofluorescence lifetime-based assay for determining the optimal cancer treatment strategy for individual patients. As a postdoc at the Air Force Research Lab, Dr. Walsh used optical techniques to investigate infrared-light activation and inhibition of action potential propagation in neurons. Currently, Dr. Walsh is an assistant professor in the Biomedical Engineering Department at Texas A&M University.

    Webinar Summary

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) of the endogenous fluorophores, NAD(P)H and FAD (co-enzymes of metabolic reactions), provides a label-free method to quantify cellular metabolism. This webinar will review multi-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging methods, single cell segmentation, and intra-population heterogeneity analysis. Examples will be shown for drug response in breast cancer organoids and activation of T cells.

    Learning Objectives

    • Define fluorescence lifetime and time-correlated single photon counting imaging methods.
      Interpret label-free FLIM images of NAD(P)H and FAD.
    • Discuss segmentation and single-cell analysis techniques.

    Who Should Attend

    Anyone interested in label-free imaging, fluorescence lifetime imaging, or single-cell analysis.

    CMLE Credit: 1.0

    • Register
      • Non-member - Free!
      • Full - Free!
      • Student - Free!
      • SRL Junior Staff - Free!
      • SRL Emerging Leader - Free!
      • Scholar - Free!
      • Emeritus - Free!
      • Life - Free!
      • ISAC Staff - Free!
      • Community Administrator - Free!
      • Student Non-Member - Free!
      • SRL Junior Staff Non-member - Free!
      • Innovator - Free!
    • More Information
  • Data Analysis Rigor and Reproducibility, Part 3: Publishing Flow Cytometry Data

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 10/22/2019

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Aja Rieger, PhD & Andrew Filby, PhD

    About the Presenters

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    Aja Rieger, PhD
    Flow Core Manager
    University of Alberta

    Dr. Rieger graduated from the University of Alberta with a BSc honors in immunology and infection. She then obtained an MSc in neuroimmunology from McGill University. Following this, Aja returned to the University of Alberta for her PhD studies in comparative immunology, researching the role of macrophages in initiating and resolving inflammation in goldfish. She then moved to University of California-Berkeley for her postdoctoral fellowship in neuroimmunology. In her current role as the flow core manager at the University of Alberta, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Aja oversees the operations of both the Flow Cytometry Facility and the High Content Analysis Core. She manages a team of cytometry technologists, with a specialty in imaging flow cytometry assay development. Aja is currently an ISAC SRL Emerging Leader.

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    Andrew Filby
    Director of the Newcastle University Cytometry and Single Cell Core Technology Unit
    Newcastle University

    Dr. Filby graduated summa cum laude from the University of Huddersfield with a first class honors in biochemistry. After graduating, he undertook a Ph.D. at the National Institute for Medical Research (NIMR) in Mill Hill, London. He worked on the Src family kinases LCK and Fyn in adaptive immunity, obtaining his PhD in molecular and cellular immunology from University College London (UCL).  Dr. Filby remained in the immunological field at the NIMR, working as a postdoctoral researcher on models of retroviral infection. He then worked in the commercial sector before taking up the deputy head role of the cytometry core at the London Research Institute (now the Francis Crick). Dr. Filby is currently director of the Newcastle University Cytometry and Single Cell Core Technology Unit. He leads a dedicated team of cytometry specialists with the sole aim of developing and implementing comprehensive, cutting-edge cytometry methods for the wider research community at Newcastle University and beyond. A significant part of his focus is the development of novel cytometry-based techniques that have underpinned several high-profile publications in journals including Science (2012, 2017, and 2018), Cell (2013), and Nature (2018). His current research is focused on whether label-free imaging cytometry techniques can be used to refine or replace the need for directed probes in order to prove cellular identity.

     Webinar Summary

    This webinar will give an overview of the current guidelines for publishing flow data with a high level of rigor. We will discuss publication of both standard flow cytometry data, as well as imaging cytometry, mass cytometry, and genomic cytometry data sets.

    Learning Objectives

    • Understand MIFlowCyt guidelines for publishing flow cytometry data.
    • Use best practices for communicating cytometry data in publications.
    • Review key points to include in any methods section toward reproducibility.
    • Explore data repositories.

    Who Should Attend

    Anyone interested in publishing high-quality, rigorous flow cytometry data.

    CMLE Credit: .75

    • Register
      • Non-member - Free!
      • Full - Free!
      • Student - Free!
      • SRL Junior Staff - Free!
      • SRL Emerging Leader - Free!
      • Scholar - Free!
      • Emeritus - Free!
      • Life - Free!
      • ISAC Staff - Free!
      • Community Administrator - Free!
      • Student Non-Member - Free!
      • SRL Junior Staff Non-member - Free!
      • Innovator - Free!
    • More Information
  • Handling Challenging Samples in an SRL Core

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 10/16/2019

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Nicole Poulton, PhD & Rachael Sheridan

    About the Presenters

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    Nicole Poulton, PhD
    Director of the Facility for Aquatic Cytometry
    Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences

    Nicole Poulton is a research scientist and director of the Facility for Aquatic Cytometry at Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences, in East Boothbay, Maine. Her research uses both flow and imaging cytometry to identify and examine viruses, bacteria, and plankton from natural environments. She works primarily with samples from natural communities, ranging from lakes and oceans to hyper-saline ponds, sediments, soil, and mineral rich hot springs. She is an active educator and trains cytometrists, students, and scientists interested in learning aquatic and environmental cytometric techniques. Nicole received her PhD from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Joint Program.

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    Rachael Sheridan
    Director of the Flow Cytometry Core Facility
    Van Andle Research Institute

    Rachael Sheridan is the director of the Flow Cytometry Core facility at the Van Andle Research Institute in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Her core supports a wide array of biomedical research ranging from immunology and metabolism to neurodegenerative disease and cancer. She works with samples originating from multiple tissue types as either whole cells or isolated nuclei, and she is always excited to try something new. Before moving to Grand Rapids, Rachael trained at the University of Wisconsin—Madison Carbone Cancer Center Flow Cytometry Core where she discovered her passion for flow cytometry and education.  

    Webinar Summary

    Life in a Shared Resource Flow Cytometry Laboratory (SRL) is always dynamic. In addition to routine samples, we are often faced with challenging and unique samples. In research settings these could be anything from subcellular organelles, such as nuclei and mitochondria, debris-ridden tissue preps, or non-mammalian organisms including plant cells and plankton, as well as bacteria and viruses. Each of these samples present unique challenges to the SRL cytometrist. In this tutorial, the presenters will discuss and present experiences working with these samples in both a biomedical and aquatic cytometry core facility and provide some approaches and tips to keep in mind when you confront these types of samples.  

    This webinar will address the following:

    • What types of samples can be analyzed by flow cytometry (biomedical to environmental)?
    • Why are SRLs observing more challenging samples?
    • How do operators prepare samples for cytometric analysis?
    • What steps should be considered during instrument setup?
    • Is auto-fluorescence a friend or foe?

    Learning Objectives

    This webinar and discussion will provide participants with a better understanding of how to handle and prepare for different types of samples as the biomedical field expands, as well as use of core facility changes. We will provide a link to a "tips and tricks" webpage addressing how to handle a variety of samples. 

    Who Should Attend

    SRL Core employees and researchers interested in working with non-traditional samples within a research or core facility setting.

    CMLE Credit: 1.0

    • Register
      • Non-member - Free!
      • Full - Free!
      • Student - Free!
      • SRL Junior Staff - Free!
      • SRL Emerging Leader - Free!
      • Scholar - Free!
      • Emeritus - Free!
      • Life - Free!
      • ISAC Staff - Free!
      • Community Administrator - Free!
      • Student Non-Member - Free!
      • SRL Junior Staff Non-member - Free!
      • Innovator - Free!
    • More Information
  • Data Analysis Rigor and Reproducibility, Part 2: Analysis Tools

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 09/24/2019

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Sofie Van Gassen, PhD

    About the Presenter

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    Sofie Van Gassen, PhD
    Postdoctoral Researcher
    Gent University Center for Inflammation Research

    Sofie Van Gassen received her MS in computer science from Ghent University in 2013 and her PhD in computer science engineering from Ghent University in 2017. During her PhD, she developed machine learning techniques for flow and mass cytometry data. She is an ISAC Marylou Ingram Scholar. As a postdoc she is further developing and improving machine learning techniques for single cell data in the DaMBi group (VIB - UGent Center for Inflammation Research).

    Webinar Summary

    Some of the current data analysis tools will be presented including tools for visualization (e.g., SPADE, tSNE, UMAP), automated gating (e.g., flowDensity, flowLearn), and population discovery (e.g., Citrus, FlowSOM, CellCNN). Detailed pros and cons of these methods will be highlighted along with a discussion on how to pick a good tool.

    Learning Objectives

    •     Learn about the dimensionality reduction algorithms, clustering algorithms, and population discovery tools.
    •     Discuss guidelines and learn how to select which tool is best depending on a given situation.

    Who Should Attend

    Anyone exploring analysis tools they could apply to their cytometry data.

    CMLE Credit: .75

    • Register
      • Non-member - Free!
      • Full - Free!
      • Student - Free!
      • SRL Junior Staff - Free!
      • SRL Emerging Leader - Free!
      • Scholar - Free!
      • Emeritus - Free!
      • Life - Free!
      • ISAC Staff - Free!
      • Community Administrator - Free!
      • Student Non-Member - Free!
      • SRL Junior Staff Non-member - Free!
      • Innovator - Free!
    • More Information
  • Quality Assessment of Ki67 Staining Using Cell Line Proliferation Index and Stain Intensity Features

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 09/17/2019

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Alex Skovsbo Jørgensen

    About the Presenter

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    Alex Skovsbo Jørgensen
    Assistant Professor
    Department of Health Science and Technology
    Aalborg University

    Alex is an assistant professor in the Department of Health Science and Technology at Aalborg University. His research focus is using machine learning and image analysis within the domain of digital pathology. His current research topics of interest within digital pathology is automated cancer detection and grading, artificial intelligence, and quality assessment of staining protocols. 

    Webinar Summary

    Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer among women worldwide. Ki67 can be used as an immunohistochemical pseudo marker for cell proliferation to determine how aggressive the cancer is and thereby the treatment of the patient. No standard Ki67 staining protocol exists, resulting in interlaboratory stain variability. Therefore, it is important to determine the quality control of a staining protocol to ensure correct diagnosis and treatment of patients. Currently, quality control is performed by the organization NordiQC that use an expert panel-based qualitative assessment system. However, no objective method exists to determine the quality of a staining protocol.

    Learning Objectives

    •     Understand the challenges of staining quality assessment.
    •     Use cell lines for assessment of stain quality.
    •     How to use image analysis and machine learning for quality assessment of staining protocols.
    •     Understand validation challenges.

    Who Should Attend

    Pathologists and engineers within medial image analysis and machine learning.

    CMLE Credit: 1.0

    • Register
      • Non-member - Free!
      • Full - Free!
      • Student - Free!
      • SRL Junior Staff - Free!
      • SRL Emerging Leader - Free!
      • Scholar - Free!
      • Emeritus - Free!
      • Life - Free!
      • ISAC Staff - Free!
      • Community Administrator - Free!
      • Student Non-Member - Free!
      • SRL Junior Staff Non-member - Free!
      • Innovator - Free!
    • More Information
  • Data Analysis Rigor and Reproducibility, Part 1: Experimental Design

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 08/15/2019

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Dagna Sheerar, SCYM

    About the Presenter

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    Dagna Sheerar, SCYM
    Manager
    University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center (UWCCC) Flow Lab

    Dagna Sheerar has been working in flow cytometry shared resource laboratories since 2000, starting out as an assistant in organizing a BSL-3 cell sorting facility at the Immunology Services Laboratory of the Wisconsin National Primate Research Center. From there, she went on to manage the Flow Lab at the University of Western Ontario for three years. In 2006, Ms. Sheerar returned to the University of Wisconsin—Madison to work in the Carbone Comprehensive Cancer Center’s Flow Cytometry Laboratory. In 2011, she was hired as the manager of the UWCCC Flow Lab. Always an active member in the flow cytometry community, Ms. Sheerar is a member of the Steering Committee for the Great Lakes International Imaging and Flow Cytometry Association and a member of the ISAC Shared Resources Laboratory Educational Task Force. As manager of the UWCCC Flow Lab, Ms. Sheerar focuses on providing researchers with the tools and support to perform rigorous and reproducible flow cytometry assays in basic research and clinical research trials.

    Webinar Summary

    This webinar will outline the steps and considerations in designing a successful flow cytometry assay in the context of basic research and clinical research trials. We will focus on how best to minimize variables for a robust and reproducible assay, paying attention to producing data sets well suited to downstream computational data analysis platforms.

    Learning Objectives

    • Discuss the importance of working with biostatisticians in the early experimental planning stages.
    • Describe how to create criteria for sample inclusion/exclusion and building in room for sample loss.
    • Learn the importance of validating reagents and proper quality control and characterization of instrumentation.
    • Discuss how to create rigorous protocols and the importance of record keeping and annotation.
    • Expectations for the design, optimization, and standardization of assays and data analysis pipelines.

    Who Should Attend

    • Researchers using flow cytometry assays in the course of their research.
    • SRL staff supporting researchers in the design, optimization, standardization, and data analysis of these research projects.
    • Computational biologists and biostatisticians performing data analyses for large-scale flow cytometry based experiments.

    CMLE Credit: 1.0

    • Register
      • Non-member - Free!
      • Full - Free!
      • Student - Free!
      • SRL Junior Staff - Free!
      • SRL Emerging Leader - Free!
      • Scholar - Free!
      • Emeritus - Free!
      • Life - Free!
      • ISAC Staff - Free!
      • Community Administrator - Free!
      • Student Non-Member - Free!
      • SRL Junior Staff Non-member - Free!
      • Innovator - Free!
    • More Information
  • Platelet Flow Cytometry

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 07/31/2019

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Matthew Linden, PhD

    About the Presenter

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    Matthew Linden, PhD
    Associate Professor of Haematology
    University of Western Australia

    Matthew is the Associate Professor of Haematology at the University of Western Australia, where he leads the development and delivery of haematology and cytometry education to train hospital scientists. Matthew’s research is in platelet biology and function. Working at the interface of the shared resource laboratory, discovery and translational research, Matthew has developed novel cytometry techniques for the measurement of blood platelets, and he has employed these in the development of new antiplatelet therapies. He is committed to advancing cytometry through strong, sustainable shared resource laboratories and cytometry education. Matthew is an ISAC Marylou Ingram Scholar and the president of the Australasian Cytometry Society.

    Webinar Summary

    Flow cytometry is a powerful and versatile tool which can be used to provide substantial phenotypic data on platelets including surface expression of functional receptors, bound ligands, expression of granule components, signal transduction, platelet-platelet aggregation, or interaction of platelets with leukocytes. Quantitative assessment of these parameters may facilitate the diagnosis of inherited or acquired platelet disorders, assist in the diagnosis of diseases associated with platelet activation, or help with the monitoring of safety and efficacy of anti-platelet therapy.

    Learning Objectives

    • Discuss the utility of platelet flow cytometry.
    • Describe the process by which platelet phenotype and function are measured.
    • Discuss the pre-analytical and analytical variables that can affect platelet data.

    Who Should Attend

    Clinical and research scientists who wish to measure platelet phenotype and function.

    CMLE Credit: 1.0

    • Register
      • Non-member - Free!
      • Full - Free!
      • Student - Free!
      • SRL Junior Staff - Free!
      • SRL Emerging Leader - Free!
      • Scholar - Free!
      • Emeritus - Free!
      • Life - Free!
      • ISAC Staff - Free!
      • Community Administrator - Free!
      • Student Non-Member - Free!
      • SRL Junior Staff Non-member - Free!
      • Innovator - Free!
    • More Information
  • Expansion Microscopy: Improving Resolution Through Uniform Specimen Expansion

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 05/01/2019

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Paul Tillberg, PhD

    About the Presenter

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    Paul Tillberg, PhD
    Fellow/Lab Head
    HHMI Janelia Research Campus

    Paul Tillberg completed a BS in electrical and materials engineering at UC Berkeley before going on to complete his PhD in electrical engineering at MIT, where he worked on technology development for the biological sciences. In the Boyden group, he conceived, designed, and co-led the development of Expansion Microscopy. He is currently a Fellow/Lab Head at the HHMI Janelia Research Campus, where he continues to develop and disseminate the expansion method in addition to other avenues of technology development for biology.

    Webinar Summary

    The expansion microscopy method improves the effective resolution of any optical microscope by ~4-fold by uniformly expanding biological specimens. Expansion is achieved by embedding the tissue in an ultra-swellable gel, followed by a few simple processing steps. The method is easy to adopt and well suited as a histology core facility offering, as it is compatible with existing antibody and fluorescent protein labelling protocols without modification.

    Learning Objectives

    • Discuss how to do expansion microscopy.
    • Describe the variants associated with expansion microscopy.
    • Learn the strengths and drawbacks to evaluate expansion microscopy for user specific applications.

    Who Should Attend

    Any biologist interested in probing the nanoscale structure of fixed tissue. Basic histology and imaging skills are useful for the smooth adoption of expansion microscopy.

    CMLE Credit: .75

    • Register
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      • Student - Free!
      • SRL Junior Staff - Free!
      • SRL Emerging Leader - Free!
      • Scholar - Free!
      • Emeritus - Free!
      • Life - Free!
      • ISAC Staff - Free!
      • Community Administrator - Free!
      • Student Non-Member - Free!
      • SRL Junior Staff Non-member - Free!
      • Innovator - Free!
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  • A Guide to Choosing Fluorescent Protein Combinations for Flow Cytometric Analysis Based on Spectral Overlap

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 04/09/2019

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Andre Olsson, PhD

    About the Presenter

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    Andre Olsson, PhD
    Research Associate
    Lee Grimes Lab

    Andre received his PhD in experimental hematology at the Faculty of Medicine, Lund University in Sweden. In graduate school he studied the function of the ETO (Eight Twenty One) homologues and found that they are involved in regulating hematopoietic progenitor maintenance and lineage differentiation. As a research associate at Lee Grimes lab, he has focused on understanding myeloid lineage decisions during homeostasis. Hematopoiesis is a great system for studying cells and the processes that instruct the cells how to function. Flow cytometry enables people to study cells at a single cell level, and thus is a very powerful tool to map and characterize cells going through differentiation.

    Webinar Summary

    Fluorescent protein labeling of specific genes combined with surface marker profiling can more specifically identify a cell population. The advent of facile genome engineering technologies has made the generation of gene-expression or fusion-protein reporters more tractable. While there are a number of fluorescent proteins available, their choice as reporter constructs is made difficult by the lack of data on how sensitivity and other factors are affected when two or more fluorescent proteins are combined. We characterize the detection sensitivity, spectral overlap, and spillover spreading of 13 monomeric fluorescent proteins to determine their utility in multicolor panels.

    Learning Objectives

    • Describe how to consider fluorescent protein detection sensitivity for fusion-protein studies.
    • Learn how spectral overlap and spillover spreading impacts which fluorescent proteins to combine in an experiment.
    • Discuss how experimental validation is key to successful panel design.

    Who Should Attend

    Anyone interested in using fluorescent proteins in their in vivo or in vitro research.

    CMLE Credit: .5

    • Register
      • Non-member - Free!
      • Full - Free!
      • Student - Free!
      • SRL Junior Staff - Free!
      • SRL Emerging Leader - Free!
      • Scholar - Free!
      • Emeritus - Free!
      • Life - Free!
      • ISAC Staff - Free!
      • Community Administrator - Free!
      • Student Non-Member - Free!
      • SRL Junior Staff Non-member - Free!
      • Innovator - Free!
    • More Information
  • The Art of Dimensionality Reduction: What Really Matters

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 03/28/2019

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Karel Drbal, PhD

    About the Presenter

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    Karel Drbal, PhD

    Karel Drbal obtained a MSc in cell biology and a PhD in immunology from Charles University in 1991 and 2000, respectively. For most of his career he has been specialized in monoclonal antibody generation and characterization (MEM-series) by flow cytometry. After postdoctoral fellowships with Dr. Hannes Stockinger at Medical University Vienna and Dr. Vaclav Horejsi at Institute of Molecular Genetics of CAS, he held the CSO position in biotech enterprise Exbio Praha from 2010 to 2013. He is a teacher of immunology, systems biology, and cytometry, and in 2015 he launched the Lab of Molecular Dynamics of the Immune Response at Charles University.

    Webinar Summary

    Karel will introduced the state-of-the-art dimensionality reduction algorithms (SNE variants and UMAP) for unsupervised cytometry data analysis. Next, these algorithms will be compared side by side to the new EmbedSOM algorithm based on FlowSOM clustering approach. The importance of input data quality, the logic of clustering and embedding workflow and the output annotation will be described with the examples in R environment. Finally, the results of benchmarking datasets as well as few use cases analyzed by hierarchical dissection of the embedded data will be presented. To close, the comparison of manual workflow and the subjective visual perception of the output quality will be discussed, as well as the future directions of unsupervised versus supervised analysis beyond the field of cytometry will be outlined.

    Learning Objectives

    • Discuss the principle of the new EmbedSOM algorithm and the associated workflow.
    • Learn the differences between the embedded algorithms for data visualization.
    • Describe hierarchical dissection of complex datasets including statistical output.
    • Discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the unsupervised process.

    Who Should Attend

    • Clinical and research scientists collecting multidimensional data not only in the field of cytometry but also in the fields of microscopy, transcriptomics, and proteomics.
    • Computational scientists and bioinformatics core personnel interested in unsupervised data visualization.

    CMLE Credit: 1.0

    • Register
      • Non-member - Free!
      • Full - Free!
      • Student - Free!
      • SRL Junior Staff - Free!
      • SRL Emerging Leader - Free!
      • Scholar - Free!
      • Emeritus - Free!
      • Life - Free!
      • ISAC Staff - Free!
      • Community Administrator - Free!
      • Student Non-Member - Free!
      • SRL Junior Staff Non-member - Free!
      • Innovator - Free!
    • More Information
  • Fluorescent Retroviruses as Reference Particles for Nanoscale Flow Cytometry

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 02/26/2019

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Vera A. Tang, PhD

    About the Presenter

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    Vera A. Tang, PhD
    Operations Manager
    Flow Cytometry and Virometry Core Facility at the University of Ottawa

    Vera helped to establish the Flow Cytometry and Virometry Core Facility at the University of Ottawa in 2013 when she became the first operations manager of the facility. Through her role in the core facility, she has channeled her passion for acquiring and sharing knowledge into teaching and research. Aside from new user training, she has developed courses in flow cytometry for undergraduate and graduate programs at the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Ottawa. Her research involves the development of retroviruses for use as fluorescence standards, as well as developing protocols for analysis of viruses and EVs by small particle flow cytometry. This work has led to the formation of a company of which Vera is a founding member and CSO. Vera is an active member of the cytometry community. She was accepted into the ISAC Shared Resource Lab Emerging Leaders Program in 2018 and is also serves as the co-president of the Canadian Cytometry and Microscopy Association.

    Webinar Summary

    This webinar will Introduce fluorescent retroviruses as potential fluorescence reference particles, as well as how they can be used in small particle flow cytometry. It will also discuss features of viruses that are unique from available small particle reference materials and showcase new projects underway for development of MESF viruses.

    Learning Objectives

    • Improve understanding of the challenges for small particle flow cytometry.
    • Emphasize the need for reference materials and reagent development in small particle flow cytometry.
    • Introduce flow cytometrists to flow virometry.

    Who Should Attend

    Anyone who has an interest in the analysis of small particles such as EVs and viruses.

    CMLE Credit: 1.0

    • Register
      • Non-member - Free!
      • Full - Free!
      • Student - Free!
      • SRL Junior Staff - Free!
      • SRL Emerging Leader - Free!
      • Scholar - Free!
      • Emeritus - Free!
      • Life - Free!
      • ISAC Staff - Free!
      • Community Administrator - Free!
      • Student Non-Member - Free!
      • SRL Junior Staff Non-member - Free!
      • Innovator - Free!
    • More Information
  • Validation, the Key to Translatable Flow Cytometry

    Contains 3 Product(s)

    A three-part CYTO U Webinar series on Validation, the Key to Translatable Flow Cytometry

    Instrument qualification and method validation are two of the pillars required for obtaining cytometry data that are reliable and suitable for decision making. In this three-part webinar series all aspects of validation for flow cytometry, from the instrument to the assay, will be covered.  

    Validation, the Key to Translatable Flow Cytometry, Part 1: Method Validation—Overview, Concepts

    Validation, the Key to Translatable Flow Cytometry, Part 2: Method Validation—Planning and Executing

    Validation, the Key to Translatable Flow Cytometry, Part 3: Instrument Qualification

    • Register
      • Non-member - Free!
      • Full - Free!
      • Student - Free!
      • SRL Junior Staff - Free!
      • SRL Emerging Leader - Free!
      • Scholar - Free!
      • Emeritus - Free!
      • Life - Free!
      • ISAC Staff - Free!
      • Community Administrator - Free!
      • Student Non-Member - Free!
      • SRL Junior Staff Non-member - Free!
      • Innovator - Free!
    • More Information
  • Validation, the Key to Translatable Flow Cytometry, Part 3: Instrument Qualification

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 10/29/2018

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Cherie Green

    About the Presenter

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    Cherie Green
    Senior Scientific Manager
    Flow Cytometry Biomaker Group
    Genentech

    Cherie Green has been a member of the cytometry community for over 20 years working in hematopathology and biotech laboratories. She is passionate about development of robust biomarker assays to support all phases of drug development. Currently, she oversees the Flow Cytometry Biomarker Group in the Development Sciences department at Genentech, a member of Roche Group in San Francisco, CA. Her group is responsible for the development and validation of clinical biomarker assays in the areas of infectious, autoimmune, and oncology diseases. She has served as the co-chair of Flow Cytometry Action Committee of the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS) and has co-authored many consensus/recommendation papers on topics specific to drug development such as instrument and assay validation, sample stability, and receptor occupancy. 

    Webinar Summary

    The foundation of good data starts with the instrument. While substantial effort is often invested in development and validation of analytical methods or analysis, instrument validation is often neglected. It is essential to apply the same analytical and scientific rigor to the platform generating the data. From initial optimization and characterization of performance to establishing QC systems to ensure longitudinal data comparability, instrument validation strategies are critical components of generating robust and reliable data. This is true for all laboratory environments but particularly relevant for regulated labs providing decision-enabling biomarkers. Generating quality data plays a critical role in bringing new therapeutic options to the medical community—drugs which eventually manifest as successful new treatments for those individuals afflicted with disease.

    Learning Objectives

    In this webinar, you will learn the basic principles of instrument validation. Validation of flow cytometers used in regulated environments provides assurance that the output generated on these instruments is reproducible and precise. The most relevant elements of instrument validation include testing to verify that an instrument is installed properly and performs as intended. This includes establishing controlled procedures for installation, maintenance, calibration, cross-instrument standardization, and longitudinal performance monitoring. This course will review basic concepts of instrument validation and provide examples of each step in the process that can be applied in your lab.

    Who Should Attend

    Anyone interested in getting robust and reliable flow cytometry data.

    CMLE Credit: 1.0

    • Register
      • Non-member - Free!
      • Full - Free!
      • Student - Free!
      • SRL Junior Staff - Free!
      • SRL Emerging Leader - Free!
      • Scholar - Free!
      • Emeritus - Free!
      • Life - Free!
      • ISAC Staff - Free!
      • Community Administrator - Free!
      • Student Non-Member - Free!
      • SRL Junior Staff Non-member - Free!
      • Innovator - Free!
    • More Information
  • DAFi - Directed Automated Filtering and Identification of Cell Populations from Polychromatic Flow Cytometry Data

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 10/25/2018

    A Cytometry Part A Spotlight CYTO U Webinar presented by Yu “Max” Qian, PhD

    About the Presenter

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    Yu "Max" Qian, PhD
    Assistant Professor of Informatics
    J. Craig Venter Institute


    Dr. Yu “Max” Qian is an assistant professor of informatics at the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI). Max was one of the original developers of the flow cytometry (FCM) component of ImmPort, the NIAID/DAIT-funded immunology database and analysis portal, where he developed the FLOCK clustering method for computational identification of cell populations from FCM data. He led or collaborated with other FCM bioinformatics researchers in development of data transformation methods, information standards, data models, and software systems, including FCSTrans, MIFlowCyt, FuGEFlow, and GenePattern FCM suite. Collaborating with researchers from several institutions, he has recently focused on design and implementation of a web-based computational infrastructure—FlowGate (flowgate.jcvi.org)—for supporting clinical and translational research through data-driven reproducible analysis of FCM experiment data. He has been customizing data analytical pipelines and performing computational analytics of FCM data for multiple NIH-funded research projects, including the Respiratory Pathogens Research Center (RPRC) at University of Rochester and the Human Immunology Project Consortium (HIPC) center at the La Jolla Institute for Allery and Immunology.

    Webinar Summary

    Although auto-gating approaches have advantages over traditional manual gating analysis, there exist roadblocks before a cytometry lab can adopt an auto-gating approach for cell population identification in routine use. It was found that combining recursive data filtering and clustering with constraints converted from the user manual gating strategy can effectively address these roadblocks. This new approach is named DAFi: Directed Automated Filtering and Identification of cell populations. Design of DAFi preserves the data-driven characteristics of unsupervised clustering for identifying novel cell subsets, but also makes the results interpretable to experimental scientists through mapping and merging the multidimensional data clusters into the user-defined two-dimensional gating hierarchy. The recursive data filtering process in DAFi helped identify small data clusters which are otherwise difficult to resolve by a single run of the data clustering method due to the statistical interference of the irrelevant major clusters. Our experiment results showed that the results of DAFi, while being consistent with those by expert-centralized manual gating, have smaller technical variances across samples than those from individual manual gating analysis and the nonrecursive data clustering analysis. Compared with manual gating segregation, DAFi-identified cell populations avoided the abrupt cut-offs on the boundaries. DAFi has been implemented to be used with multiple data clustering methods including K-means, FLOCK, FlowSOM, and the ClusterR package. For cell population identification, DAFi supports multiple options including clustering, bisecting, slope-based gating, and reversed filtering to meet various auto-gating needs from different scientific use cases.

    Learning Objectives

    • Gain an understanding of what the cutting-edge auto-gating approaches can do and their limitations in general.
    • Learn how DAFi works, what it can do and cannot do, as well as how to apply DAFi to the analysis of polychromatic FCM datasets.
    • Assess the performance of an auto-gating approach using visualization and other computational methods.
    • Get to know the FlowGate cyberinfrastructure being developed.

    Who Should Attend

    Everyone who is interested in FCM bioinformatics, especially those who have been planning to apply auto-gating approaches for computational identification of cell populations from polychromatic FCM data.

    CMLE Credit: 1.0

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  • Step-by-Step Multi-parameter Panel Design

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 10/15/2018

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Jennifer Wilshire, PhD & Tomas Baumgartner

    The Presenters

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    Jennifer Wilshire, PhD
    Assistant Manager
    Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

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    Tomas Baumgartner
    Manager
    Flow Cytometry Core Facility
    Weill Cornell Medicine

    Webinar Description

    This webinar will focus on the process of building multicolor panels. We will break the process down into step-by-step guides based on the number of colors in your panel. This webinar will also provide a framework for those teaching multicolor panel design in an educational setting such as a Shared Resource Lab.

    Learning Objectives

    • Know the three processes used to build multicolor panels.
    • Choose the correct step-by-step process based on the number of colors in the panel.
    • Interpret spillover spreading matrix/resolution impact matrix to determine which colors contribute spreading to others.
    • Practice building a multicolor panel using all the tricks and tips discussed in the webinar.

    Who Should Attend

    Anyone who is designing multicolor panels or teaching others how to design multiparameter panels.

    CMLE Credit: 1.0

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  • Validation, the Key to Translatable Flow Cytometry, Part 2: Method Validation - Planning and Executing

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 09/10/2018

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Teri Oldaker

    About the Presenter

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    Teri Oldaker
    Clinical Laboratory Consultant

    Teri is a licensed clinical laboratory scientist and certified cytometrist with over 40 years clinical laboratory and 34 years flow cytometry experience in reference laboratory settings.  She is currently in a consultant role for a number of clinical laboratories. Her prior roles include director of flow cytometry at Genoptix, Neogenomics, Genzyme Genetics, and Nichols Institute. Teri has served on the board of the International Clinical Cytometry Society (ICCS) as secretary/treasurer and councilor, and is on the faculty of both the ICCS and Clinical Cytometry Education Network (CCEN) Flow Courses. She is a member of the following ICCS committees: Advocacy, Certification, and Quality and Standards Committees. She has authored four book chapters and over 40 publications in the field of flow cytometry.

    Webinar Description

    This webinar will review the specifics on how to conduct a validation. We will begin with an introduction of the various regulated environments and accreditation bodies requiring assay validation. Then we will discuss how to conduct the appropriate validation for each environment. The distinction between assay qualification and validation will be reviewed. Various strategies to designing method validation protocols will be discussed. These recommendations will be aligned with the upcoming Clinical Laboratories Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines regarding the number of samples, number of analytical runs, data analysis, and acceptance criteria. Examples of a biomarker validation and a clinical laboratory validation will be presented. Lastly, an update on the progress of a regulatory guidance document for the validation of flow cytometric methods will be presented.

    Learning Objectives

    In the second webinar of the series, you will learn the how to convert the principles learned in the first webinar into practice in your own laboratory. We will describe what you actually need to do to validate a method.

    • An introduction to the different types of regulatory environments.
    • Gain an understanding of the difference between assay development, optimization, and validation.
    • Gain an understanding of the fit-for-purpose and context-of-use validation approaches.
    • Learn to prepare user-friendly documentation.

    Who Should Attend

    Anyone using flow cytometry who wants to generate high-quality data.

    CMLE Credit: 1.0

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  • 16-Color Panel to Measure Inhibitory Receptor Signatures from Multiple Human Immune Cell Subsets

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 08/09/2018

    A Cytometry Part A Spotlight CYTO U Webinar presented by Anna Belkina, MD, PhD

    About the Presenter

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    Anna Belkina, MD, PhD
    Associate Director of the Flow Cytometry Core Facility
    Assistant Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
    Boston University School of Medicine

    Anna Belkina is the associate director of the Flow Cytometry Core Facility and an assistant professor of pathology and laboratory medicine at Boston University School of Medicine. She received her MD from Russian State Medical University in Moscow and her PhD degree from Boston University School of Medicine investigating the epigenetic regulation of inflammatory responses driven by bromodomain proteins. Anna’s research is focused on the intersection of immunology and computational biology. Her current efforts include investigating the immune landscape of chronic inflammatory diseases and developing computational techniques to assess high-parameter single cell cytometry data. Anna is an active member of ISAC and was named an ISAC SRL Emerging Leader in 2015.

    Webinar Summary

    This webinar will walk you through the development and optimization of a 16-color human flow cytometry panel for combinational analysis of the Inhibitory Receptors PD-1, TIGIT, CD160, LAG-3, TIM-3 and the activation marker CD137 from CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, NK cells, iNKT cells, and gamma delta T cells. A flow cytometry panel that measures 5-plex IR signatures from multiple populations of immune cells would be useful for both mechanistic studies of exhaustion as well as translational research efforts for a wide span of chronic diseases such as cancer and HIV, especially in the context of scarce sample material.

    This panel was thoroughly optimized for use on a 4-laser, 16-detector BD FACSARIA II SORP. In order to gain optimal performance from using multiple polymer fluorophores, panel design was preceded by instrument calibration and optimization based on previous publications. The selection of reagents was defined by predicted marker distribution on cells and levels of their expression and fluorophore "brightness," as well as predicted spillover spread within the fluorophore matrix and reagent availability from common suppliers. When multiple clones were available for particular antigens of interest, selections were made after thorough literature review. Finally, FMO tests were performed to verify specificity of observed populations. Several reagents to limit spillover spread in the channels that appeared to be more vulnerable to this issue.

    The conclusion will include some data from a large-scale study, where this panel has been employed, to successfully map an IR-specific phenotype in a cohort of aviremic HIV+ individuals and link it to disease.

    Learning Objectives

    • Recall basic principles of high-parameter panel design and prerequisite instrument optimization.
    • Review major human immune subset mapping with surface markers.
    • Demonstrate the process of panel development and optimization.
    • Evaluate the resulting panel design with real life application.

    Who Should Attend

    High-parameter flow cytometry practitioners including primary researchers and core facility staff, as wellas scientists who want to start building their own extensive multicolor flow cytometry panels.

    CMLE Credit: 1.0

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  • Stem Cell Image Cytometry: Quantitative Strategies for Cell Sourcing in Musculoskeletal Tissue Engineering

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 08/01/2018

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by George Muschler, MD

    About the Presenter

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    George Muschler, MD
    Orthopedic Surgeon
    Cleveland Clinic

    Dr. George Muschler is a nationally-recognized Cleveland Clinic orthopedic surgeon who has devoted his career to advancing patient care through basic and clinical research and quality management. As a clinician-scientist, his research laboratory focuses on adult stem cell biology and tissue engineering, with particular interest in improving methods for harvesting and processing of human stem cells and progenitors to enhance tissue regeneration and repair, design, and use of quantitative assays of stem cells. His work also focuses on progenitor cells relevant to tissue health and aging, particularly in modulating stem and progenitor cell growth and remodeling kinetics in settings of disease or injury. Dr. Muschler has authorized over ten patents including Colonyze, a quantitative automated image analysis system for assay of stem cells and progenitors.

    Webinar Summary

    Cells are the core resource for biological products and biomanufacturing. No new tissue is formed without cells. However, cell populations from different donors and tissues are highly variable with respect to the concentration, prevalence, and the biological potential. Managing this variation is a profound challenge in the design, fabrication, and quality control of cell therapies. This webinar will discuss the basic research and the development of a robotic image-based cell picking technology to determine quantitative factors that may predict cell/colony quality.

    CMLE Credit: 1.0

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  • Engineering Synthetic Immunity to Cancer and Beyond

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 07/11/2018

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Michael Milone, PhD

    About the Presenter

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    Michael Milone, PhD
    Associate Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
    Associate Director, Toxicology Laboratory
    University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine

    Dr. Michael Milone received his MD and PhD in experimental pathology in 1999 from New Jersey Medical School. After an internship in internal medicine and post-graduate medical training in clinical pathology and transfusion medicine at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, he pursued a post-doctoral research fellowship with Dr. Carl June at the University of Pennsylvania, where he studied T cell immunotherapy for cancer and designed the CD19-specific CAR-T cell therapy that became CTL019 (tisagenlecleucel, KymriahTM), the first FDA-approved gene therapy in the US. He is a founding member of the Center for Cellular Immunotherapies at the University of Pennsylvania. He currently directs a research laboratory focused on basic and translational immunology that includes the design and application of synthetic immunoreceptors for adoptive cellular therapy of cancer and antibody-mediated disease.    

    Webinar Summary

    This webinar will provide an overview of engineered T cell adoptive immunotherapies that utilize synthetic immunoreceptors termed chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). Topics to be covered include the design of CAR-T cells, approaches to preclinical assessment of efficacy and toxicity, and the clinical application of this technology to the treatment of malignant and autoimmune disease.

    Learning Objectives

    • Understand the design and mechanism of action of engineered T cell adoptive immunotherapies using chimeric antigen receptors (CARs).
    • Describe some of the challenges to applying CAR-T cell therapy to cancer therapy.
    • Discuss the clinical application of engineered T cells.

    Who Should Attend

    Scientists, physicians, or technologists with an interest in immunotherapy.

    CMLE Credit: 1.0

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  • Akadeum Microbubbles and Flow Cytometry: Technology, Tools, and What's to Come

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 06/21/2018

    A CYTO U webinar presented by John Younger

    About the Presenter

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    John Younger
    Chief Technology Officer
    Akadeum Life Sciences

    John Younger formed Akadeum Life Sciences in 2014 with his co-founder Brandon McNaughton to bring microbubble-based tools to the life sciences. Buoyancy is a powerful alternative to magnetic methods for cell separation and offers exciting new ways of working with samples in research, diagnostic, and therapeutic applications. Prior to joining Akadeum, John enjoyed a 21-year career as a physician scientist at the University of Michigan. While his clinical practice was in emergency medicine, his laboratory focused on the ways in which living cells interact—for good or ill—with engineered materials.

    Webinar Summary

    John will present a short technical background about buoyant cell isolation, highlighting how microbubbles differ from magnetic particles. Next, he will share how microbubbles are improving the ways that users are preparing samples for flow cytometry and FACS. To wrap up, John will review current products available and give a preview about what cell separation products are coming. Lastly, for upcoming products, John will discuss how you and your team can have early access to kits.

    Learning Objectives

    • Review how microbubbles can improve your research and development.
    • Examine how microbubbles can replace or be combined with your current magnetic methods.
    • Discuss what new Akadeum products are coming in 2018 and 2019.

    Who Should Attend

    Researchers who want a simple way to isolate cells with no columns and no magnets.

    CMLE Credit: .5

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  • Rapid Comparative Immunophenotyping of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 06/07/2018

    A Cytometry Part A Spotlight CYTO U Webinar presented by Tamara Lekishvili, PhD

    About the Presenter

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    Tamara Lekishvili

    Dr. Tamara Lekishvili received her PhD in biochemistry from Tbilisi State University, Georgia. Later she was awarded with the NATO scholarship and continued her research at Norwegian University of Science and Technology in neurobiology. After two dynamic post-doctoral positions at the University of Bath and University of Birmingham, she joined the LGC Group, were she is a certified flow cytometry specialist within the cell and molecular biology team. Her major research focus is developing novel cell-based assays using different flow cytometry applications.

    Webinar Summary

    Standardization of flow cytometry methods is required to support robust and reliable quality assessment of cells during bioprocessing. Fluorescent cell barcoding (FCB) overcomes some of the limitations of conventional flow cytometry methods with improved accuracy and data quality. However, measurement variability across instruments or between analysts remains a challenge that must be addressed.

    A modified fluorescent cell barcoding method using fixable viability dye eFlour 506 has been developed that reduces the potential for such variation. Proof of principle has been demonstrated for multiplexed immunophentoypic analysis using cultured human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) exposed to a variety of bioprocessing conditions during cell expansion.

    This approach, which can easily be transferred to a variety of cell types, represents a further step toward achieving the rigor and robustness required for quality assessment of bioprocessing of cell therapy products, allowing more subtle variations in marker expression levels to be confidently observed.

    See the original article in Cytometry Part A.

    Learning Objectives

    • Describe the modified cytosolic fluorescent cell barcoding method.
    • Provide the critical technical considerations during the FCB method development.
    • Demonstrate the rapid hMSC immunophenotyping utilizing FCB approach.

    Who Should Attend

    Scientists and researchers interested in FCB by flow cytometry for the rapid and reproducible immunophenotyping.

    CMLE Credit: 1.0

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  • Imaging Flow Cytometry

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 04/04/2018

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Joanne Lannigan, MS

    About the Presenter

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    Joanne Lannigan, MS
    Director of the Flow Cytometry Core Facility 
    School of Medicine at the University of Virginia

    Joanne Lannigan was an early adopter of Imaging Flow Cytometry (IFC). Having received the fifth commercially produced IS100 instrument in 2005, she has worked with many investigators to develop numerous protocols and applications for this technology. Her work, and the work of her colleagues, has appeared in many different journals, including journal front covers, and has also been published in Current Protocols in Cytometry. Her lab has continued to upgrade IFC instrumentation over the years and currently uses a four laser, multi-magnification two camera, Imagestream MKII system to explore ways to utilize this technology to answer scientific questions not well served by conventional flow cytometry or traditional fluorescence microscopy. Her most recent interests involve the use of IFC for the analysis of submicron particles (extracellular vesicles, viruses, and other nanoparticles).  

    Webinar Summary

    Conventional flow cytometry has been an extremely valuable tool due to its high-parameter and high-throughput capabilities for single cell analyses. Using fluorescence and scatter measurements, it has the ability to analyze many different cellular components on thousands to millions of cells in relatively short acquisition times, providing an efficient technology for robust statistical analyses. The limitations of conventional flow cytometry, however, are the lack of morphological information and fluorescence localization, such as is possible with fluorescence microscopy. Fluorescence microscopy on the other hand, while providing morphological and fluorescence localization information, lacks the high throughput and hence the statistical power of flow cytometry. In addition, there is an inherent bias in the image field selection for analysis.

    Learning Objectives

    Ideally, a technology which can provide unbiased high-parameter, high-throughput flow cytometric data, while also providing morphological and fluorescence localization information would be a very valuable tool. Imaging Flow Cytometry (IFC) as provided by the Imagestream MKII and Flowsight instruments are such tools. In this webinar, you will learn how this technology works, as well as how this technology has enabled studies which typically would be very difficult to achieve by conventional flow cytometry. A number of published applications will be presented.

    CMLE Credit: 1.0

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  • 21-Color Flow Cytometry for Immunophenotyping Human Blood

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 03/27/2018

    A Cytometry Part A Spotlight CYTO U Webinar presented by Karl Staser, MD, PhD

    About the Presenter

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    Karl Staser, MD, PhD
    Ascension Medical Group

    Dr. Karl Staser graduated with a BA in American History and Literature from Harvard College in 2002. He then enrolled in the Indiana University School of Medicine, where he completed a Howard Hughes Medical Institute “year-out” research fellowship for medical students and subsequently entered the Indiana University Medical Scientist Training Program under the supervision of Dr. Wade Clapp. Dr. Staser then joined the Physician Scientist Training Program at Washington University and completed his internal medicine internship and dermatology residency at Barnes-Jewish Hospital in 2017. He is now researching novel therapies for graft-versus-host disease and cutaneous T cell lymphoma in Dr. John F. DiPersio’s lab at the Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University in St. Louis.

    Webinar Summary

    The 21-color flow cytometry panel enables simultaneous quantification of monocytes, basophils, granulocytes, dendritic cells, natural killer cells, B cells, and all well-defined T and T helper cell subsets in the human peripheral blood. This panel captures the major phenotypes described in the NIH Human Immunology Project with additional markers for deep T cell analysis. We specifically designed this panel for peripheral blood analysis from patients involved in our clinical trials of novel agents for the treatment of graft versus host disease (GVHD) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT). We have optimized this panel for the analysis of 1x10^6 fresh or previously frozen peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs).

    Learning Objectives

    • Describe the process of designing and validating a 21-color flow cytometry panel.
    • Demonstrate the application of this particular 21-color flow cytometry panel.
    • Discuss troubleshooting and experimental refinement of 21-color flow cytometry.

    Who Should Attend.

    Physicians, scientists, and other researchers interested in high-color flow cytometry for the rapid and reproducible immunophenotyping of human blood.

    CMLE Credit: 1.0

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  • SRL Finance 101: Equipment Maintenance

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 02/20/2018

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Julie A. Auger and Joanne Lannigan, MS

    About the Presenters

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    Julie A. Auger, PhD
    Executive Director
    Research Core Facilities Program

    Julie A. Auger has been a member of the cytometry community since 1985 and is widely recognized for her expertise in the operation and administration of multi-technology, multidisciplinary academic resource centers. She serves as the executive director of the Research Core Facilities Program at the University of California Davis, where she is responsible for the development of a central support structure to optimize organization and administration for over 100 shared research facilities. Prior to her current position at UC Davis, Julie developed similar programs at UC San Francisco and The University of Chicago. She developed her core facility management expertise at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign and at the University of Chicago, where she developed internationally reputed flow cytometry core facilities.

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    Joanne Lannigan, MS
    Director of the Flow Cytometry Core Facility 
    School of Medicine at the University of Virginia

    Joanne Lannigan has been actively involved in flow cytometry for over 30 years, where she has worked in clinical, industry and academic flow cytometry laboratories. She is currently the director of the Flow Cytometry Core Facility in the School of Medicine at the University of Virginia. She has been an active member of ISAC since 1996 and served as an ISAC Council Member from 2012-2016, the Chair of the Shared Resource Laboratory Task Force from 2014-2016, a member of the Shared Resource Laboratory Services Oversight Committee from 2014-2016, and Vice Chair of the Certification Advisory Committee from 2014-2016. She currently is the Chair of the SRL Content Task Force of the Education Committee as well as a member of the Cytometry Board of Certification Committee through ASCP. Ms. Lannigan’s current interests involve advancing technologies in cytometry, small particle analysis by flow cytometry, instrument evaluation and quality assurance, flow cytometry education and core management.

    Webinar Summary

    This is the third and final webinar in the SRL Finance 101 series. Second only to personnel costs, equipment maintenance is one of the largest expenditures in a core’s budget. However, in order for a core to operate efficiently and offer excellent customer service, all equipment needs to operate reliably and consistently, minimizing incidents of downtime. Improper equipment maintenance can be costly, resulting in significant loss in revenue and customer confidence. But how does one provide this without breaking the budget? When do you spring for the high dollar service contract versus time and material service visits? What is self-insurance and when is it appropriate? Are third party service companies a viable option? One-size fits all does not apply to all core facility operations and many factors come into play when making decisions as to which maintenance options are best for your specific environment. This webinar will present some strategies for determining which maintenance options are the most appropriate and cost effective for your specific situation.

    Learning Objectives

    • Recognize the impact of equipment downtime.
    • Determine actual equipment maintenance history and costs.
    • Evaluate different equipment maintenance options.
    • Identify the variables that impact the choice of equipment maintenance plans.
    • Construct an effective plan to manage equipment maintenance costs.

    Who Should Attend

    Shared Resource Lab (SRL) directors, managers, and staff.

    CMLE Credit: 1.0

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  • Focused Ion Beam Scanning Electron Microscopy (FIB-SEM)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 12/18/2017

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Kedar Narayan, PhD

    About the Presenter

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    Kedar Narayan, PhD
    Group Leader
    Center for Molecular Microscopy

    Kedar Narayan is the group leader for cellular imaging at the Center for Molecular Microscopy (CMM) at the National Cancer Institute. He earned a PhD in immunology and has a research background in chemistry, pathology, and biophysics. Kedar's work focuses on the use of emerging technologies for subcellular imaging. At the CMM, he is responsible for FIB-SEM technology development and for driving collaborative projects that use FIB-SEM, electron tomography and correlative imaging approaches to explore cellular architecture and mechanisms.

    Webinar Summary

    Focused ion beams (FIBs), previously restricted to the materials sciences and semiconductor fields, are rapidly becoming powerful tools for ultrastructural imaging of biological samples. In focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM), subcellular architecture of resin-embedded cells and tissue can be investigated by cycles of iterative FIB milling or "slicing" of the sample followed by SEM imaging. The FIB can also be used as a sculpting tool to create specific specimen shapes that can be analyzed further by transmission electron microscopy or by methods that probe chemical composition.

    FIB-SEM imaging can also be correlated with light or other imaging modalities to provide complementary image information. While not a high-throughput technique, FIB-SEM fills an important "imaging gap" in biology, allowing for 3D ultrastructural imaging of large samples at nanoscale resolutions. A primer is provided to the application of FIB-SEM in biology, including a guide to the practical aspects of using the technology, as well as selected examples of its contribution to the generation of new insights into subcellular architecture and mechanisms underlying host-pathogen interactions.

    CMLE Credit: 1.0

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  • SRL Finance 101: Budgeting

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 12/13/2017

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Julie A. Auger & A. Nicole White, MBA

    About the Presenters

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    Julie A. Auger, PhD
    Executive Director
    Research Core Facilities Program

    Julie A. Auger has been a member of the cytometry community since 1985 and is widely recognized for her expertise in the operation and administration of multi-technology, multidisciplinary academic resource centers. She serves as the executive director of the Research Core Facilities Program at the University of California Davis, where she is responsible for the development of a central support structure to optimize organization and administration for over 100 shared research facilities. Prior to her current position at UC Davis, Julie developed similar programs at UC San Francisco and The University of Chicago. She developed her core facility management expertise at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign and at the University of Chicago, where she developed internationally reputed flow cytometry core facilities.

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    A. Nicole White, MBA
    Shared Facility Administrator
    Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center 

    A. Nicole White began her career working in a flow cytometry core for five years and later transitioned into administration after acquiring her MBA in 2010. She currently serves as the shared facility administrator for Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center (CCHMC) and oversees 28 shared facilities, including veterinary services. She is also responsible for managing finance and operations through a centralized capacity. Nicole has implemented a centralized support structure for the shared facilities and continues to support ongoing efforts in operations for the shared facilities at CCHMC. She is active within the Association for Biomolecular Resource Facilities (ABRF), which works with core facility operations and management topics across multiple disciplinary and interdisciplinary platforms.

    Webinar Summary

    Many core facility scientists are charged with managing their labs as small businesses but have never had any formal training in finance or accounting. Therefore, they are at a disadvantage when it comes to strategic decisions that involve money. This includes determining how much money is needed to run the core, how to appropriately set recharge rates, and how to best manage expenses. This is the first of three webinars that address the basics of financial management for the scientific manager. 

    Learning Objectives

    • Define the need for and benefit of an operating budget (OB).
    • Introduce the tools and information needed to create an effective OB.
    • Discuss guiding principles for a robust OB.
    • Demonstrate how to monitor actual spending compared to budget.

    Who Should Attend

    All core facility directors and staff who are involved with spending or revenue generation are encouraged to attend. No previous formal financial training is necessary. 

    CMLE Credit: 1.0

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  • Pushing the Limits of Clinical Cytometry

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 11/15/2017

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Jonni Moore, PhD

    About the Presenter

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    Jonni Moore, PhD
    Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
    University of Pennsylvania

    Dr. Jonni Moore has over 30 years of experience in clinical and research flow cytometry. She has led one of the largest flow cytometry and cell sorting shared resource labs since 1992 and was founding director of the Clinical Flow Cytometry Laboratory at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Her current focus is on deep phenotyping in translational and clinical settings and the development of liquid biopsies utilizing ultra-sensitive flow cytometry.

    In 2016 she received the Wallace H. Coulter Distinguished Lecturer Award for lifetime contributions to the science, education, and practice of clinical cytometry. Being in the unique position of leadership in both clinical and research flow cytometry laboratories, she focuses on the movement of novel translational assays to the clinical arena.

    Webinar Summary

    This webinar will focus on the recent new technologies that are expanding the reach of translational and clinical cytometry, not only in traditional areas, but also in new areas like solid tumors and cardiovascular diseases. The power of the technology to provide important information in these settings will be highlighted as well as the necessity for biocomputational approaches for both current and developing applications.

    Webinar Objectives

    • To highlight new technologies that can extend the reach of clinical cytometry.
    • To highlight new disciplines that are emerging in clinical cytometry.
    • To introduce the role of biocomputation in the clinical realm.
    • To stimulate interest in the opportunities for development in the translational/clinical area.

    Who Should Attend this Webinar

    Clinicians, lab directors, technologists, and scientists who are interested in translational and clinical cytometry.

    CMLE Credit: 1.0

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  • Cytotype: Single Cell Analysis Workflows for Complex Tissues & Tumors

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 10/20/2017

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Jonathan Irish, PhD

    About the Presenter

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    Jonathan Irish, PhD
    Assistant Professor 
    Department of Cell and Developmental Biology (CDB)
    Vanderbilt University

    Jonathan Irish is an assistant professor in the Department of Cell and Developmental Biology (CDB) at Vanderbilt University, School of Medicine. He holds a secondary appointment in Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology (PMI) and is scientific director of the Cancer and Immunology Core (CIC) and the Mass Cytometry Center of Excellence (MCCE). Jonathan launched the Irish Lab at Vanderbilt in 2012 after finishing his training with Garry Nolan and Ron Levy at Stanford University. Jonathan holds a BS in biology, a BS in chemistry,  and a BS biochemistry from the University of Michigan. He received a PhD in cancer biology from Stanford University.

    CMLE Credit: 1.0

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  • The Image Data Resource: Publishing, Integrating and Mining Biological Imaging Data @ Scale

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 10/10/2017

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Jason Swedlow, PhD

    About the Presenter

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    Jason Swedlow, PhD
    Professor of Quantitative Cell Biology
    School of Life Sciences, University of Dundee

    Jason Swedlow earned a BA in chemistry from Brandeis University in 1982 and PhD in biophysics from UCSF in 1994. After a postdoctoral fellowship with Dr. TJ Mitchison at UCSF and then Harvard Medical School, Dr. Swedlow established his own laboratory in 1998 at the Wellcome Trust Biocentre at the University of Dundee as a Wellcome Trust Career Development Fellow. He was awarded a Wellcome Trust Senior Research Fellowship in 2002 and named Professor of Quantitative Cell Biology in 2007.

    His lab focuses on studies of mitotic chromosome structure and dynamics, and he has published numerous leading papers in the field. He is co-founder of the Open Microscopy Environment (OME), a community-led open source software project that develops specifications and tools for biological imaging. In 2005, he founded Glencoe Software Inc., a commercial start-up that provides commercial licenses and customization for OME software. In 2011, Dr. Swedlow and the OME Consortium were named BBSRC's Social Innovator of the Year and Overall Innovator of the Year. In 2012, he was named Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.

    Dr. Swedlow has organized or directed several courses in quantitative microscopy at the Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole (USA), Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (USA), and the National Centre for Biological Science (Bangalore, India).

    Webinar Summary

    Much of the published research in the life sciences is based on image datasets that sample 3D space, time, and the spectral characteristics of detected signal to provide quantitative measures of cell, tissue, and organismal processes and structures.

    To address this challenge, we have built a next-generation imaging resource, the Image Data Resource (IDR), an added value resource that combines data from multiple independent imaging experiments and from many different imaging modalities, integrates them into a single resource, and makes the data available for re-analysis in a convenient, scalable form.

    Who Should Attend this Webinar

    Biologists, imaging scientists, computational scientists, and policymakers interested in using, sharing, analyzing, and publishing rich, multi-dimensional image datasets.

    CMLE Credit: 1.0

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  • SRL Best Practices, Part 7: Staffing

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 08/30/2017

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Matthew Cochran & Rob Salomon

    About the Presenters

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    Matt Cochran
    Technical Director
    URMC Flow Cytometry SRL

    Matt Cochran is the technical director of the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry (URMC) Flow Cytometry SRL. The lab contains eight traditional analytical flow cytometers, two cell sorters, an Image Stream X imaging cytometer, and a CyTOF mass cytometer. It serves the upstate NY region from Buffalo to Ithaca. Matt began his career in flow cytometry in 2004 at the Rochester Human Immunology Core Lab, where he managed an 8-color LSRII.. He has experience with many traditional and non-traditional cytometers and a wide variety of applications, including large-scale immunophenotyping and panel design. In addition to the Rochester cytometry training program, which he’s been running for around eight years, he’s been teaching and consulting nationally for a number of years. Matt is also a member of the ISAC Shared Resource Laboratory Task Force, the ABRF flow cytometry research group, and the GLIIFCA steering committee.

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    Rob Salomon
    Technical Director
    Garvan-Weizmann Centre for Cellular Genomics

    Rob Salomon is the inaugural technical director of the Garvan-Weizmann Centre for Cellular Genomics. Rob has a background in biology and engineering and is interested in leveraging cutting-edge technology to answer important biological questions. In 2014, he was named a SRL Emerging Leader by ISAC. Since then, Mr. Salomon has played a major role in both the Australian and International Cytometry Societies.

    CMLE Credit: 1.0

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  • SRL Best Practices Series

    Contains 7 Product(s)

    This 7-part webinar series explores the best practices of a successful SRL facility, including data management, SOPs, training & education, safety, QA, operations, and staffing.

    Part 1: Managing Data in a Flow Cytometry Core

    Part 2: Standard Operating Procedures

    Part 3: Training and Education

    Part 4: Laboratory Safety

    Part 5: Quality Control / Quality Assurance

    Part 6: Operations

    Part 7: Staffing

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  • SRL Best Practices, Part 4: Laboratory Safety

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 05/30/2017

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Joanne Lannigan, MS

    About the Presenter

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    Joanne Lannigan, MS
    Director of the Flow Cytometry Core Facility
    School of Medicine at the University of Virginia

    Joanne Lannigan was an early adopter of Imaging Flow Cytometry (IFC). Having received the fifth commercially produced IS100 instrument in 2005, she has worked with many investigators to develop numerous protocols and applications for this technology. Her work, and the work of her colleagues, has appeared in many different journals, including journal front covers, and has also been published in Current Protocols in Cytometry. Her lab has continued to upgrade IFC instrumentation over the years and currently uses a four laser, multi-magnification two camera, Imagestream MKII system to explore ways to utilize this technology to answer scientific questions not well served by conventional flow cytometry or traditional fluorescence microscopy. Her most recent interests involve the use of IFC for the analysis of submicron particles (extracellular vesicles, viruses, and other nanoparticles).  

    Webinar Summary

    The importance of adequate safety practices within an SRL is critical to the overall function of such facilities. Working in a “shared” environment, in which a large variety of biological samples are introduced, requires a reasonable set of “best practices” to ensure the safety of everyone who accesses the shared facility. The best practices presented here represent what should be minimally present to provide a safe working environment.

    Learning Objectives

    • Describe the minimal practices for insuring a safe laboratory environment in a shared resource core lab.
    • Assess the potential biosafety risks in an SRL or core lab.
    • Develop a plan to minimize the exposure of staff and users to potential hazards.
    • Consider the factors of the lab physical environment which are consistent with a safe work place.
    • Recognize the importance of administrative factors in the assurance of a safe work environment.

    Who Should Attend

    Directors, managers, and staff of shared resource or core facilities.

    CMLE Credit: 1.0

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  • High Speed Imaging at and Beyond the Diffraction Limit

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 05/09/2017

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Hari Shroff, PhD

    About the Presenter

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    Hari Shroff, PhD
    Chief of the High Resolution Optical Imaging Laboratory
    National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB)

    Dr. Hari Shroff received a BSE in bioengineering from the University of Washington in 2001, and under the supervision of Dr. Jan Liphardt, completed his PhD in biophysics at the University of California at Berkeley in 2006. He spent the next three years performing postdoctoral research under the mentorship of 2014 Nobel Laureate Eric Betzig at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Janelia Farm Research Campus, where his research focused on development of photo-activated localization microscopy (PALM), an optical super-resolution technique. Dr. Shroff is now Chief of NIBIB's Section on High Resolution Optical Imaging laboratory, where he and his staff are developing new imaging tools for application in biological research. His current research interests include light sheet microscopy, structured illumination microscopy, and neurodevelopment.

    Webinar Summary

    Dr. Shroff will discuss his efforts to improve structured illumination microscopy (SIM) and light-sheet microscopy. SIM doubles the spatial resolution of light microscopy, requiring lower light intensities and acquisition times than other super-resolution techniques. He will present SIM implementations that enable resolution doubling in live volumes > 10-20x thicker than possible with conventional SIM, as well as hardware modifications that enable effectively "instant" SIM imaging at rates 10-100x faster than other SIM. New applications of instant SIM, including combination with total internal reflection (TIRF) and with adaptive optics will also be discussed.

    The second half of the talk will focus on the development of inverted selective plane illumination microscopy (iSPIM), and subsequent application to the noninvasive study of neurodevelopment in nematodes. Dr. Shroff will discuss progress that quadruples the axial resolution of iSPIM by utilizing a second specimen view, thus enabling imaging with isotropic spatial resolution (dual-view iSPIM or diSPIM). Newer multi-view results with more objectives and more views, further improving spatial resolution, will also be shown. Applications of these technologies will be presented, including computational methods for untwisting worm embryos and imaging calcium flux within worm embryos.

    Learning Objectives

    After attending this webinar, attendees should have familiarity with new, high resolution methods for imaging live cell biology and developmental biology. There will also be an introduction to imaging neurodevelopment in nematode embryos.

    Who Should Attend

    Cell biologists, developmental biologists, and microscopists.

    CMLE Credit: 1.0

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  • A Pipeline to Explore the Human Cell

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 04/25/2017

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Winfried Wiegraebe, PhD

    About the Presenter

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    Winfried Wiegraebe, PhD
    Director for Microscopy and Image Analysis
    Allen Institute for Cell Science

    Winfried Wiegraebe received his diploma in biophysics and machine tools and industrial management from the Technical University in Munich, Germany. For his diploma and PhD thesis he joined the Department of Molecular Structural Biology headed by Wolfgang Baumeister at the Max-Planck Institute for Biochemistry in Martinsried, Germany. Under the mentorship of Reinhard "Guckus" Guckenberger, Winfried investigated hydrated bacterial surface proteins with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). He developed an atomic force microscope (AFM) to measure their conductivity. He complemented this data with measurements of their local elasticity and friction. In 2001, Winfried joined the Carl Zeiss group in the USA and helped customers to be successful users of confocal and two-photon microscopes (NLO) as well as FCS.

    In 2005 Winfried moved back to academia and joined the Stowers Institute for Medical Research in Kansas City, Missouri, USA. He created the group for Advanced Instrumentation and Physics and later became the head of the Stowers Microscopy Center. In this capacity he supported and built with his team a large variety of microscope techniques, from laser micro-dissection to super-resolution techniques and light sheet microscopy. He developed technology to automatically perform FCS measurements on 4000 different proteins in yeast.

    Webinar Summary 

    At the Allen Institute for Cell Science, we believe that understanding the organization of healthy, living cells and their changes during growth, differentiation, and other processes is an essential starting point to understanding cellular changes caused by disease. The textbook cartoons of the human cells that we are familiar with are based more on imagination than on solid data. To develop the needed image-based cellular data, we are developing a pipeline to create large, high replicate data sets for us and other scientists in academia and industries to analyze, model, and generate new hypotheses about cellular behaviors. We use gene-edited hiPS cells, since they are diploid, relatively homogeneous, and can be induced to differentiate into many other cell types. In the first iteration, we are identifying the locations of the major cellular machines and signaling pathways using genome-edited, fluorescently tagged proteins that we image with automated light microscopes. We are analyzing these image-data using statistical models.

    CMLE Credit: 1.0

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  • SRL Best Practices, Part 3: Training & Education

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 04/12/2017

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Michele Black & James Marvin

    About the Presenters

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    Michele Black
    Technical Director
    Cell Analysis Facility
    University of Washington

    Michele Black has been working in the field of cytometry for 20 years. She work at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center's Flow Lab as the senior flow cytometry specialist from 1996 to 2013. For the past fourteen years, Michele has been the technical director of the Cell Analysis Facility at the University of Washington. She has been an active member of ISAC since 1996 and has served on both the Shared Resource Laboratory Task Force and the SRL Services Committee. She is committed to providing quality flow cytometry services and education to researchers while increasing access to advanced technologies. She supports research activities while maintaining a fiscally-sound core that consistently provides affordable, high-quality service.

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    James Marvin
    Director Flow Cytometry Core Facility
    University of Utah

    James Marvin has spent virtually his entire career within a flow cytometry shared resource setting. In 2001 James joined the bustling flow lab at the University of Chicago under the tutelage of Julie Auger and Ryan Duggan. This was the era in which cell sorters were a bit more “hands on,” and a firm understanding of the underlying hardware was essential on a daily basis. Next, James moved on to Northwestern University to “pick the brain” of Dr. Charles Goolsby. In addition to the routine aspects involved in a flow core, a transition to more clinical assays was pursued during this time. Through a strong collaboration with industry as well as academic partners, significant strides were made in optimizing assays related to signal transduction analysis in normal as well as diseased bone marrow. Finally, in 2011, James uprooted from the Midwest in search of the mountains and desert of Utah where he has been the Director of the Flow Lab at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City. One of the many unifying themes through each of these distinct labs was the emphasis that education and training played for both facility staff and clients.

    Webinar Summary

    Education and training are essential parts of a SRL and cover a wide range of topics. As cytometry SRLs are likely to be centered on technology and instrumentation, education within the lab should strongly focus on both the theoretical workings of the instrumentation as well as the specific details of running and acquiring samples for both staff and the end user. This training and education webinar aims to provide specialized guidance for best practices at SRL facilities across the globe and is the third of seven in our SRL Best Practices series. This series is not intended to specifically define how to implement these recommendations but rather to help establish a set of goals for an SRL to reach its desired level of excellence.

    Learning Objectives

    A well balanced and thorough training and educational curricula within an SRL will touch on a very broad range of topics. The presenters will outline what should be addressed when developing an education program, such as:

    •     Instrumentation
    •     Experiment Design
    •     Reagents
    •     Lab Safety
    •     Facility Policies
    •     Data Analysis

    Creating an education and training program within an SRL will promote a consistent approach to introducing new staff and end users to a lab,and ensure that everyone has the appropriate knowledge to successfully utilize the instrumentation in the lab.

    Who Should Attend

    The intended audience for the discussion is staff of all levels associated with a flow cytometry core facility.

    CMLE Credit: 1.0

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  • SRL Best Practices, Part 2: Standard Operating Procedures

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 03/28/2017

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Carina Torres & Benjamin J. Daniel, PhD

    About the Presenters

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    Carina Torres
    Manager
    Flow Cytometry Core
    Eli Lilly

    Carina Torres has spent the past 18 years as a shared resource professional in both academic and industry environments. Her current role as manager of the flow cytometry core at Eli Lilly in San Diego involves developing, implementing, and optimizing cytometry technologies to assist in antibody discovery and engineering platforms. She is co-founder of the San Diego Society for Cytometry and serves as a member of ISAC's SRL Task Force.

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    Benjamin Daniel, PhD
    Director
    Flow Cytometry Shared Resource
    UT Health

    Dr. Benjamin Daniel has been the director of the Flow Cytometry Shared Resource at the UT Health, San Antonio for the past seven years. Prior to this, he studied how aging affects the immune responses to cancer. He has been on the program committee for the past several CYTO conferences, along with the Shared Resource Laboratory Taskforce. He also currently serves as the vice president for FlowTex, a Texas-based flow cytometry user group.

    Webinar Summary

    As the second of seven in the SRL Best Practices series, this live webinar will give the audience an overview of the importance of standard operating procedures (SOPs) and why they are important for all day-to-day activities. Several examples of SOPs will be discussed.

    Learning Objectives

    By the end of this webinar, viewers should understand the importance of SOPs, which ones are most important, and have general guidelines on how to author them.

    Who Should Attend

    SRL leaders and staff who want to learn more about the importance of SOPs.

    CMLE Credit: 1.0

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  • Flow Cytometry Analysis of Human Hematopoietic Progenitors in Cardiovascular Disease

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 09/27/2016

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Thomas Cimato, MD, PhD

    About the Presenter

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    Thomas Cimato, MD, PhD
    Associate Professor
    University at Buffalo Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences

    Dr. Cimato is an associate professor in the Division of Cardiology at the University at Buffalo Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences and an adjunct investigator at the Roswell Park Cancer Institute.

    His research focuses on the role of inflammation on hematopoietic differentiation in atherosclerosis. He is also involved in collaborative studies that focus on the role of hematopoietic progenitor cells as immune suppressor cells in cancer.

    Webinar Summary

    In this webinar he will discuss recent advances in our understanding of how early hematopoietic progenitors respond to hypercholesterolemia and myocardial infarction in animal models to accelerate atherosclerosis. He will discuss the development of an assay to measure human hematopoietic progenitors in blood and early translational studies in human subjects with heart disease. 

    CMLE Credit: 1.0

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  • Introduction to Imaging Flow Cytometry and its Preclinical and Clinical Applications

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 05/24/2016

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Hans Minderman

    About the Presenter

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    Hans Minderman
    Assistant Director
    Flow and Image Cytometry Facility
    Roswell Park Cancer Institute

    As the assistant director of the Flow and Image Cytometry Facility at Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Hans Minderman oversees the research applications of the various imaging (e.g., confocal, live cell imaging, ImageStream cytometry) and flow cytometry platforms available in the facility, and collaborates and consults with the investigator user base. With over 30 years of experience in clinical applications of flow and image cytometry, he has served as the PI on the NIH funded study on clinical application of multispectral imaging flow cytometry. Analytical approaches that were developed during this period are now actively applied in the analysis at his facility of patient samples from national and international clinical trials. In addition, the ImageStream-specific experience gained and methods developed during this research are currently applied to support ongoing NIH- and non-NIH-funded research efforts by the facility’s user base. 

    Webinar Summary

    Imaging flow cytometry combines the speed, sensitivity, and quantitative capabilities of conventional flow cytometry with the spatial resolution and quantitative capabilities of microscopy. In this webinar, the differences and commonalities between conventional flow cytometry and imaging flow cytometry are explained. With studies in cell signaling being one of the foremost applications of imaging flow cytometry, the audience will be guided through the analytical process of studying the NFkB signaling pathway by imaging flow cytometry. How this approach compares to conventional techniques of studying this pathway such as western blot analysis, microscopy, and flow cytometry will be presented. During this exercise the basic principles of image analysis are explained, from the creation of the digitized images to how regions of interest are defined and how quantitative features can be derived. The webinar will end with a short overview of preclinical and clinical applications of imaging flow cytometry. 

    Who Should Attend

    The course is intended for researchers and students who may have previous experience with conventional flow cytometry but have yet to be introduced to imaging flow cytometry.

    CMLE Credit: 1.0

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